Dog Myths – So True or So False?

Think you’ve got your pup all figured out? Not so fast, sometimes we hear things so many times we think it is true but is it? UGODOG investigates to uncover common assumptions about dogs and if they are..

So True or So False?

“A dog’s mouth is cleaner than a human’s”
So False! Not even close. Just think about where that mouth has been all day. Since dogs and humans have similar enzymes for breaking down food, so there is no real big difference there.
Many people think since they see a dog licking it’s wound and will notice that the wound heals very fast that the dog’s what that tongue does is it gets rid of the dead tissue,” said Becker. He compares that tongue lashing to the work of a surgeon who cleans out a wound, and said the licking also stimulates circulation.

“A dog’s mouth contains a lot of bacteria,” states Dr. Gary Clemons, a veterinarian in Milford, Ohio. “Remember, a dog’s tongue is not only his wash cloth but also his toilet paper.”
However since most of the bacteria in the mouth of a dog are species specific, it won’t harm its owner. In fact, you are more likely to get a serious illness from kissing a person than kissing a dog. Since dogs do transmit some germs it is important to “Keep the vaccines current. Good external parasite control, good internal parasite control. You’re going to be good to go.” Says veterinarian and fellow dog lover Marty Becker, author of “Chicken Soup for the Dog Owner’s Soul.”

“Don’t Stare a Dog in the Eyes.”
So True! In the canine world, prolonged eye contact rarely occurs in friendly contexts; it is more commonly seen as a threat or challenge to another dog. Direct eye contact may occur in play, but outside of specific situations, prolonged eye should be avoided.
Cesar Millan, dog behaviorist and star of the TV series Dog Whisperer. Says:
“When you meet a new dog, especially one that may be dangerous, you must project calm assertiveness. A lot of people who meet a new dog want to go over to him, touch him, and talk to him. In the language of dogs, this is very aggressive and confusing. Instead, wait for the dog to come over and smell you and check you out. While he does this, act like you’re ignoring him. Don’t make eye contact. Once he analyzes and evaluates you, he’ll tell you how he feels about you.”

“Wet nose = healthy dog”.
So False! The temperature and moistness of your dog’s nose has nothing to do with his health, says veterinarian Suzanne Hunter, DVM. A dog’s nose will run hot and cold, wet and dry all day long. A moment of dryness is no reason for alarm. As is always the case with your pet, all we’ve got to go on in any situation is behavior. Wouldn’t it be fantastic if all our four legged, two winged, swimming or slithering pets could speak? But they can’t, so we observe. And periodic moments of dryness alone are probably not signs of illness. But if that snout is more dry than normal, more frequently than usual, the color or texture changes or it is accompanied by other uncommon symptoms, there could be a problem.
Dry nose accompanied by a decrease in energy level, lack of appetite, is always reason to consult your vet. Other signs of illness:
• Vomiting and diarrhea
• Urinating more or less often than normal
• Coughing and sneezing
• Discharge from eyes, ears, or nose

“Chocolate is poisonous for dogs”
So True! Chocolate can sicken and even kill dogs, and it is one of the most common causes of canine poisoning, say veterinarians at WebMD. Chocolate is made from cocoa, and cocoa beans contain a chemical compound called theobromine, which is the real danger. This chemical compound can cause severe reactions when truly toxic amounts are ingested including induced hyperactivity, tremors, high blood pressure, rapid heart rate, seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest while even very small amounts can cause vomiting and diarrhea.

“An excited dog is happy to see you.”
So False! “It’s very easy to come home to a dog that is jumping, running around, or spinning in circles, and interpret that as the dog being glad you’re home. But that’s not what’s really happening,” says Cesar Millan, dog behaviorist and star of the TV series Dog Whisperer.
It’s a sign that your dog has more energy than he can handle in that moment.
Millan’s advice: Ignore him when he’s overexcited, then reward him with attention when he calms down.

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    One Response to “Dog Myths – So True or So False?”

    1. Óculos Says:

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