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UGODOG's Blog offers articles, animal news, pet care tips and photos. You can search for related topics, browse by cateogry, recent posts, or view our blog archives. You'll find all of that just below our getting started kit!

Dog Friendly Road Trips

November 8th, 2013

Planning a road trip are some of the most wonderful times any of us will experience and why not experience it with your beautiful dog? Why shouldn’t they enjoy the trip with their family like everyone else?
Travel Dog
Here are some tips on how to plan dog friendly road trips
1) Create or harness your dog when riding in the car. It’s safer for your dog and you’ll be less distracted. Try to exercise your dog before he goes in the car. If he can burn off excess energy he’ll enjoy the ride more.
2) If you do crate your dog in the car, make sure there’s nothing loose in there that can hurt him in case you do get in an accident or have to stop suddenly.
3) Don’t feed your dog a large meal before the ride or during the ride. Dogs are prone to motion sickenss. It’s recommended to give them a small protein snack when you’ve stopped the car at a rest stop.
4) When the weather is warm we urge you to never leave your dog in a parked car. Even with the window cracked, the temperature in the car can rise to a level that affects your dog. He can get dehydrated quickly.
5) If you’re staying at a pet friendly hotel, take your dog for a long walk before you retire to the room. It will help to relax him and acquaint him with the new temporary surroundings.
6) Bringing an indoor dog potty product with you may be an option for the times that you cannot stop or the weather isn’t suitable for taking your dog for a walk. Also, it works wonderful in RV’s and pet friendly hotels.

Popularity: 6% [?]

Larger Size Dogs for Added Home Security

November 4th, 2013

Written by: Kate Voss
Last week we discussed the benefits of small breed dogs for home security. If you have the space and the appropriate living conditions medium size and larger dogs can add even more home security.

Living alone in a big city, I decided to rescue a Chow Chow/Australian Shepherd mix puppy whom I named Margot. Having her makes me feel so much more secure when I am home alone because she can somehow sense danger. She is constantly looking outside the window and if someone approaches our home, she runs to the door and barks. She keeps her eye out for me. However, she is a huge lap dog who wouldn’t actually hurt a fly. She is my friendly watchdog.

There is a difference between a watchdog — one that simply barks when it feels threatened or when it is protecting you — and a guard dog — one that is trained to attack if danger presents itself. Guard dogs and watchdogs can be very different and you must get the breed that fits well with your family and lifestyle, and train your dog well. Below are the top family guard dog breeds that are known for being great protectors.

Large, Intimidating Watchdogs
Larger watchdogs are used a physical threat to intruders — their size is used as intimidation, yet they usually will not attack as most are gentle breeds.

English Mastiff Guard Dog
English Mastiff: Remember the movie the Sandlot, where the kids were all terrified of the neighbor’s massive, slobbering dog — but then, in the end, it turns out it was the most loveable dog in the world. That was an English Mastiff, an adorable and powerful breed that is known for their strength. They are very friendly, but will guard their owners when they feel they are in danger. They are great dogs to have to ward off intruders because of their sheer size.

Newfoundland Watch Dog
Newfoundland: These friendly, sweet-tempered dogs get up to 150 pounds and 29 inches tall — they are massive. Again, much like the English Mastiff, their size would instantly scare away an intruder. They may look aggressive, but are a very generous and peaceful breed. They would more likely trap an intruder than attack. Newfoundland’s are also very sensitive to your tone of voice and can sense danger. They make great cuddlers and are a perfect fit for families with children.

Large, Aggressive Guard Dogs
Larger and more aggressive breeds are usually highly intelligent and can be trained to be protective and attack dogs. Note, these dogs need rigorous and consistent training as puppies, as they are prone to being very aggressive towards humans if poorly trained.

Akita Watch DogAkita: These beautiful pups are fearless, docile and need lots of exercise. They may be aggressive towards other dogs and humans that are strangers so you and all other humans must be higher up in the pack to get its respect. They are very loyal to their family but if teased they may bite, so be careful with them around children. Akitas are not excessive barkers, so they are much more suited as guard dogs than watchdogs.

German Shepherd Watch dog
German Shepherd: Known for their work in the military and police force, German Shepherds are highly intelligent, strong and alert and very eager to learn. They remain close to family and are weary of strangers. This breed should not be left isolated for long periods of time — they must be constantly socialized with people or else they may get aggressive. German Shepherds need to have a task at all times, and are a great family companion.

Rottweiler: This muscular breed is very calm and protective of owners. Rotties are seemingly immune to pain, very courageous and needs an owner who is firm in their training. You must be high up in the pack order to get their respect and obedience. Rotties need a lot of leadership and socialization but can be very good with other animals if trained well.

Dogs are great companions can be ideal protectors for you, your family and your home. Depending on what type of home security you are looking for — a dog who would simply warn you if someone was in the home, a dog who would scare away intruders, or a dog that would attack if needed — make sure you learn about a breed’s characteristics before you adopt to make sure your new dog is a perfect fit for you and your family.

Popularity: 3% [?]

Small Breed Guard Dogs for Added Home Security

October 24th, 2013

Written by: Kate Voss
Dogs are our best friends, our loyal companions, and can be our protectors too. They are there to welcome us home with a big lick on the face and to cuddle with us before bed.

Burglars only spend an average of one minute attempting to get into a home. If there is an obstacle, such as locked doors or an intimidating dogs, chances are the burglar will leave your home and try a different one. Dogs’ sense of smell and hearing make them the first the notice if something is wrong, usually long before a human could. So although installing a home security system is always a good idea, if you train your dog to guard your home and family, and also train it to be a gentle dog, you will find yourself with the perfect burglar alarm – and one that loves you back!

But not all dogs come in the same package, today we will explore the best “Small Breed” watchdogs:

Small, Yippie dogs
These breeds simply scare away intruders with their constant and high-pitched barking.

ChihuahuaChihuahua:
Maybe best known as the dog in the Taco Bell commercials, the Chihuahua is the smallest breed of dog available, and quite possibly the yappiest. They are loyal, affectionate, and very energetic. They are not recommended for children due to their pack leader aggression and their “small-dog” attitude. They get up to six pounds and love to bark. Because of this, they can act as a great watchdog for warding off intruders. Their shrill bark is guaranteed to wake up family members, maybe even neighbors, in the case of a home invasion.

Miniature Schnauzer:Miniature Schnauzer: These pups are stocky and strong with high intelligence and obedience to owners. They are great hunting dogs and their loud howl is a great way to protect your home. If trained correctly, they will be well socialized and affectionate, so they would make great family dogs. They are also great for apartments because they can remain calm indoors if they get enough exercise.

Beagle Puppy
Beagles: Much like the movie Shiloh, Beagles are known for their affection and loyalty to their family. They were originally used for hunting, so they should be in households only with dogs and no other animals. Their distinct hound howl is what makes this dog a great
watchdog. Beagles also have a great sense of smell, so they can protect your yard from
intruders, or even alert you of a fire.

Popularity: 3% [?]

UGODOG Tip #17 – Ways to Remove Pet Odor

October 23rd, 2013

Remove Pet Odor
Pet urine can fill a house with the smell of ammonia and other strong scents. Although you may get used to the scent, the longer you go without treating the stain and smell, the harder it will be to remove from your walls, carpet, clothes and furniture. You can get rid of dog urine smells whether they are new or old. Here are some solutions to help you fight the odor.

Vinegar solution
A mixture of three parts water to one part vinegar will usually get rid of dog odor, as well as eliminate the stain. The urine spot must first be soaked up to remove excess liquid before applying the solution. The solution should then saturate the spot and then be blotted up with a dry towel. Once dried, baking soda should be sprinkled over the stain. An additional measure of combining 3/4 cup of hydrogen peroxide with a small drop of dish detergent can be added to the baking soda. After the mixture is worked into the carpet, it can be vacuumed up. Test a small portion of carpet with the peroxide to see whether discoloring occurs before using the full amount.

Bleach and water
On areas where color cannot be destroyed by bleach, another recipe for removing dog odor is to clean the spot with a solution of bleach and water. After applying the bleach solution, the spot should be cleaned with water several times after to avoid leaving any residual bleach in the area

Borax
Apply Borax to the stain to remove the urine odor. It is used in much the same way as baking soda by sprinkling over the spot, rubbing in with some water and towel blotting the remaining residue. Borax must be used with care however; ingesting less than 5 grams of Borax is lethal to children and pets.

Simple Stain and Odor Remover
With Simple Solution Extreme Stain & Odor Remover every pet owner can now breathe a sigh of relief. Stains and odors will be gone with the use of Simple Solution Extreme Stain & Odor Remover on the area in question. However tough or old the stain or odor, this formula will help get rid of it. This is a nontoxic product too. It is available in 32 oz, 64 oz and 1 gallon sizes.
Simple Solution Extreme Stain & Odor Remover
• Spray bottle for easy use
• Convenient pack
• Stain/odor eliminator

Buy Simple Stain Remover Now

Popularity: 2% [?]

Easiest Dog Breeds to Train

October 8th, 2013

Top Dogs
Referenced from WebMD
In his bestselling book, The Intelligence of Dogs, neuropsychologist Stanley Coren, PhD, focuses on trainability as a marker of intelligence.

The University of British Columbia psychology professor relied on the assessments of 110 breeds by more than 200 professional dog obedience judges who scored breeds based on working/obedience tests.

The top dogs absorbed commands in less than five repetitions and obeyed them 95% of the time or better. Here’s the list along with a breed description by the American Kennel Club:
Border Collie Training
1. Border Collie: A workaholic, this breed is the world’s premier sheep herder, prized for its intelligence, extraordinary instinct, and working ability.

2. Poodle: Exceptionally smart and active. Bred to retrieve things from the water. The miniature variety may have been used for truffle hunting.

3. German Shepherd: The world’s leading police, guard, and military dog — and a loving family companion and herder.

4. Golden Retriever: Intelligent and eager to please. Bred as a hunting companion; ideal as a guide and as assistance with search-and-rescue operations.

5. Doberman Pinscher: Known for its stamina and speed. Bred to be a guardian and in demand as a police and war dog.

6. Shetland Sheepdog: The “Sheltie” is essentially a miniature working Collie. A rough-coated, longhaired working breed that is keenly intelligent. Excels in herding.

7. Labrador Retriever: An ideal sporting and family dog. Gentle and intelligent.

8. Papillon: A happy, alert breed that isn’t shy or aggressive. Known as Dwarf Spaniels in the 16th and 17th centuries, they reach 8-11 inches high.

9. Rottweiler: Robust and powerful, the breed is happiest with a job. Suitable as a police dog, herder, service dog, therapy dog, obedience competitor, and devoted companion.

10. Australian Cattle Dog: Happiest doing a job like herding, obedience, or agility. Energetic and intelligent.

Popularity: 2% [?]

APA Approved Indoor Potty That’s Better Than Fake Grass

September 30th, 2013

There are many different types of dog potty systems available for dogs and their owners to help them . There are artificial grass dog potty systems, pee pads and plastic grate systems. So, it’s no wonder that dog owners are confused as to which type and which product within that type is the best dog potty system for their dog.
UGODOG APA Approved Let’s see if we can help you to find your perfect dog training system.
The ONLY Indoor Dog Potty System With American Pet Association’s Approval
There is ONLY ONE indoor dog potty product that is approved by the American Pet Association and has received a 5 Star rating from the APA. That is the UGODOG product. APA 5 Stars is the approval of a product based on APA Testing and research that insures a product is approved for real world intended usage and is considered safe, humane and as-advertised.
We are so very proud of our dog potty product and that’s certainly a sentiment many of our clients share.
My very tiny 1.8 pound, 9 week old havanese puppy uses the Ugodog with no problem. What a smart, simple idea. I don’t want to use piddle pads, which are expensive and environmentally ugly. Plain old newspaper is cheap, abundant, and works just fine. The Ugodog isn’t exactly the same dimensions as the newspaper, but seriously-how much effort does it take to fold it to fit ? No more worrying about wet or soiled unsanitary newspaper on the floor (yuck), nothing shredded to pieces. Cleans up with very little effort. Well worth paying what they ask for the convenience and ease of use, and it pays for itself in a short time with the money saved on piddle pads.”
by Rad Mom on Amazon.com

What exactly does a 5 Star APA Rating Mean?
In order to receive this top rating from the APA, the product must meet the following requirements:
1) Humane Treatment of pets and people (product must be intended to be used, or will commonly be used in such a way that is humane to pets and the treatment of customers and employees must be positive and productive.)
2)Business Ethics (Business must pass a background check and not be involved in questionable or unethical business practices. The product claims and marketing must be factual and not misleading.)
3) Product Quality (Product must be manufactured in such a way and with quality materials so that it meets or exceeds expected lifetime)
4) Safety (The product should be safe for use as intended for both pets and humans.)
5) Ongoing Feedback (Ongoing feedback must be consistent and representative of the initial testing results for a product to remain approved. Approval status can be checked 24/7 at this site)
Our Indoor Dog Potty Goes Beyond The APA Approval
In additional to the coveted APA approval, there are other factors that make the UGODOG indoor dog potty system the best choice for you and your dog.
1) Bacteria Free – our indoor dog potty system has a unique plastic design that makes daily clean up easy and of course, keeps it bacteria free. Pee Pads may leak and artificial grass products are difficult to clean so bacteria can flourish.
2) Easy To Clean – the two grate system in the UGODOG dog potty system can be cleaned with a wet town or in a sink (how easy is that!). Compared to pee pads (which dogs can shred) and grass dog pottys (which require a hose and scrubbing to clean), there’s just no easier indoor dog potty system than the UGODOG product.
3) Cost Effective – because the UGODOG indoor dog potty is created with the highest quality materials it will last so you would most likely only purchase it once. With 2 sizes to choose from, the prices range from $49.95 to $99.95. You probably didn’t know that the average dog owner spends about $400.00 per year on pee pads and that the average cost for a grass indoor dog potty product is about $150.00. Compare these costs to the UGODOG indoor dog potty and it’s a no brainer!
4) Dry Paws – The unique convex shaped grates in the UGODOG dog potty product allows urine to pass through the grates and it then collects in the base so your dog’s paws remain dry. It’s easy to see that with pee pads and with the artificial grass potty systems, that simply is not the case. So, keep your dog from tracking urine throughout the house!
Are you ready to give yourself an easier and better indoor dog potty product? Visit us at http://www.ugodog.net and order yours today.

Popularity: 3% [?]

How To Potty Train A Yorkie

September 22nd, 2013

Dear fellow Yorkie lover,
We know that Yorkies are adorable, cute little dogs that many of us have fallen in love with. How can anyone resist? But, as cute as they are, it’s a well known issue that smaller dogs have a more difficult time with potty training than larger dogs. So, we’re here to help you. We answer questions about potty training puppies almost every day because we created the best indoor dog potty system on the market. It’s the ONLY APA (American Pet Association) approved product of it’s kind. So we know what we’re talking about.

Yorkie potty training
Learn about yorkie training and potty training puppies with our useful information below. Here are some general things to know before you begin the process of potty training your yorkie puppy.

1) Puppies are like children. And just like children, they do not know right from wrong. They have to be taught.

2) The Age Of Your Yorkie Affects The Potty Training Process

a) The general rule of thumb is that for the first 5 – 7 weeks of your Yorkie’s life, you will need an indoor potty training system is necessary and should be used in conjunction with the housebreaking process.

b) The most important time in potty training puppies takes place between the first 8 – 16 weeks. This is when it’s important that your training be consistent. That means using the same techniques and keeping to a time frame. Be aware that at this age, puppies can generally hold their bladder for as long as 2 hours. So, consider then when setting up a time frame on how often to take him out.

c) By the time your Yorkie is 16 weeks old he should be able to hold his bladder for as long as 4 hours. Your home dog training process should continue but of course by now, your puppy should be quite well trained. You can simply change your time frame now from taking him out every 2 hours to taking him out every 4 hours.

d) By the time your beloved Yorkie is 6 months old he should be able to hold his bladder for 5 – 6 hours. Most puppies are housebroken by this time, although there may be the occasional “accident”, depending on factors such as changes in the environment and of course any infections or illnesses.

If you suspect an infection or illness please take your Yorkie to your Veterinarian immediately.

Tips On Potty Training Your Yorkie Puppy

Potty train your Yorkie puppy the easy way with 7 easy to follow steps.

1) Never, ever physically punish your puppy. It’s cruel and it eventually results in bad behavior from your dog. Many dog owners make this mistake when potty training puppies so don’t make this same mistake.

2) You want to catch your Yorkie “in the act” and immediately pick him up and take him outside to where you would like him to go. Use a stern voice, enough to let him know that what he was doing was not acceptable. It’s important to catch him “in the act” because it can be confusing to your pet when you’re scolding him and he’s not sure why. You want to potty train a puppy to go outside but it takes time and patience.

3) You want your puppy to learn where it’s NOT appropriate to relieve himself. Notably in the home, near food and sleeping areas. You can do this by using a crate and an indoor potty system. Although it may seem cruel to put your beautiful Yorkie in a crate the truth is, it offers a sense of security for him. It’s “his” place. It’s important to note that he should only be confined in the crate for a short period of time. It’s not meant to be a jail cell. You can put your puppy in the crate when you’re away from home but make sure to note the recommendations we have given you regarding the age of your puppy and how often they need to relive themselves.

Crates can be metal or wood or even plastic. These days, they come in a large variety of shapes and materials. Make it comfortable for your Yorkie by making sure it’s large enough for him to turn around in and be comfortable, but not so large that they can roam. In general, dogs do not generally relieve themselves in their immediate territory so you want to keep the space small enough to avoid him “going” in his crate.

4) Consistency is the key factor in potty training puppies. Not only in timing how often to take your puppy outside but also in location. When you do take him outside, make sure to take him to the same spots. For an indoor dog potty system, make sure it remains in the same area in your home. Keep to a feeding schedule as well. Use the same language and the same tone of speech each time you are going to take him out. The more consistent you can be, the better it will be for you and your beloved dog.

5) Don’t wait to begin the house training process. As soon as you bring your new puppy home, start right away. To potty train a puppy, you need to establish your house rules as soon as you can.

6) Make sure to reward your pet by praising him when he does the right thing. Just like children, puppies need to know that they’ve pleased you.

7) A little tip that may help in the first 6 months of potty training puppies is to put up the puppy’s water bowl during the night. This will keep him from drinking throughout the night which will help him (and you) to sleep through the night!

Follow these tips and you will successfully potty train a puppy!

Well, we hope that these tips on how to house train a yorkie puppy will help you and your new family member to become the very best of friends for many, many years.

Popularity: 1% [?]

Having trouble with your dog not listening?

September 20th, 2013

If you’re having trouble with your dog not listening to you, click here for dog training advice and tips on our UGODOG blog!

Popularity: 1% [?]

How To House Train A Puppy

September 18th, 2013

Who doesn’t love a puppy? Let’s face it, they are lovable! And owning a puppy can be filled with beautiful and wonderful moments but anyone who has a puppy or is considering adopting one should also be aware that there is some work involved. Mainly, house training that puppy.
House Train a Puppy Learn about potty training puppies with our useful information. So, here are some general things to know before you begin the process of potty training your puppy.

1) Puppies are like children. And just like children, puppies do not know right from wrong. They have to be taught.

2) Age Of Your Puppy Affects How To Potty Train A Puppy

a) The general rule of thumb is that for the first 5 – 7 weeks of a puppy’s life, an indoor potty training system is necessary and should be used in conjunction with the housebreaking process.

b) The most important time in potty training puppies takes place between the first 8 – 16 weeks. This is when it’s important that your training be consistent. That means using the same techniques and keeping to a time frame. Be aware that at this age, puppies can generally hold their bladder for as long as 2 hours. So, consider then when setting up a time frame on how often to take him out.

c) By the time your pet is 16 weeks old he should be able to hold his bladder for as long as 4 hours. Your home dog training should continue but of course by now, your puppy should be quite well trained. You can simply change your time frame now from taking him out every 2 hours to taking him out every 4 hours.

d) By the time your puppy is 6 months old he should be able to hold his bladder for 5 – 6 hours. Most puppies are housebroken by this time, although there may be the occasional “accident”, depending on factors such as changes in the environment and of course any infections or illnesses.

If you suspect an infection or illness please take your pet to your Veterinarian immediately.

Tips On House Training Your Puppy

Potty train a puppy the easy way with our easy to follow steps.

1) Never, ever physically punish your puppy. It’s cruel and it eventually results in bad behavior from your dog. Many dog owners make this mistake when potty training puppies so don’t make this same mistake.

2) Catch your puppy “in the act” and immediately pick him up and take him outside to where you would like him to go. Use a stern voice, enough to let him know that what he was doing was not acceptable. It’s important to catch him “in the act” because it can be confusing to your pet when you’re scolding him and he’s not sure why. You want to potty train a puppy to go outside but it takes time and patience.

3) You want your puppy to learn where it’s NOT appropriate to relieve himself. Notably in the home, near food and sleeping areas. You can do this by using a crate and an indoor potty system. Although it may seem cruel to put your puppy in a crate the truth is, it offers a sense of security for your pet. It’s “his” place. It’s important to note that the puppy should only be confined in the crate for a short period of time. It’s not meant to be a jail cell. You can put your puppy in the crate when you’re away from home but make sure to note the recommendations we have given you regarding the age of your puppy and how often they need to relive themselves.

Crates can be metal or wood or even plastic. These days, they come in a large variety of shapes and materials. Make it comfortable for your pet by making sure it’s large enough for him to turn around in and be comfortable, but not so large that they can roam. In general, dogs do not generally relieve themselves in their immediate territory so you want to keep the space small enough to avoid him “going” in his crate.

4) Consistency is the key factor in potty training puppies. Not only in timing how often to take your puppy outside but also in location. When you do take him outside, make sure to take him to the same spots. For an indoor dog potty system, make sure it remains in the same area in your home. Keep to a feeding schedule as well. Use the same language and the same tone of speech each time you are going to take him out. The more consistent you can be, the better it will be for you and your beloved dog.

5) Don’t wait to begin the house training process. As soon as you bring your new puppy home, start right away. To potty train a puppy, you need to establish your house rules as soon as you can.

6) Make sure to reward your pet by praising him when he does the right thing. Just like children, puppies need to know that they’ve pleased you.

7) A little tip that may help in the first 6 months of potty training puppies is to put up the puppy’s water bowl during the night. This will keep him from drinking throughout the night which will help him (and you) to sleep through the night!

Follow these tips and you will successfully potty train a puppy!

Well, we hope that these tips on how to house train a puppy will help you and your new family member to become the very best of friends for many, many years.

Popularity: 1% [?]

Is your little furry friend a character?

September 13th, 2013

Popularity: 1% [?]